KnowledgeBase

[NPM Tip] Error: self signed certificate in certificate chain

May 10, 2018 JavaScript, Javascript Development, OpenSource, TypeScript, Web, Web Development No comments

As a developer, if you are behind a corporate proxy that assigns an intermediatory self signed SSL certificate to every request to provide secure content filtering as part of cybersecurity measures, I am sure you might have gone through the pain to get it working when working with NodeJS.

if you have Admin access to your windows machine, you could simply try the following fix:

    • Simply Add an Environment Variable
Environment Variable Name: NODE_TLS_REJECT_UNAUTHORIZED, Value: 0

image

image

Hope that solves your problem.

[NPM Tip] Rewriting the default protocol for GitHub package references

May 9, 2018 JavaScript, Javascript Development, OpenSource, TypeScript, Web, Web Development No comments

Some times as a Modern Web Developer you will face some “npm install” as some of the packages would be referring to git/ssh protocol to reference private packages from Git Hub.

This would fail when you are behind a corporate proxy.

Rewriting the default protocol for GitHub, run the following snippet in your command line snippets:

git config --global url."https://github.com/".insteadOf git@github.com
git config --global url."https://".insteadOf git://

Azure Cosmos DB name changes

April 17, 2018 Azure, CosmosDB, Document DB, Emerging Technologies, Microsoft, Windows Azure Development No comments

An update from Microsoft Azure says that – As part of the transition from Azure DocumentDB to Azure Cosmos DB, the service and resource names are changing from “Azure DocumentDB” to “Azure Cosmos DB” on June 1, 2018.

How does that Impact?

When Microsoft introduced Cosmos DB, then have ensured that there was a smooth transition or migration of existing Document DB customers /tenants to Cosmos DB. This was achieved by without changing underlying service and resource names from “Document DB” to “Cosmos DB”.

So, if you were an existing customer of Document DB, you have noticed the only disappearance of Document DB name and old service showing simply Cosmos DB. You did not feel much difference apart from some additional configuration options as part of multi-modal data source configuration.

Your ARM deployment templates might need some changes in resource sizing, resource location, and some other configuration aspects.

There is no a pricing impact because of this change, but you will have to modify billing parameters that rely on the new names. Now with this deadline what Microsoft intends to have is to deprecate the use of Old DocumentDB naming and start migrating all customers/tenants to follow the new naming for the resource billing/sizing purposes.

To read more about the naming changes: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/name-changes-cosmos-db/

What’s Azure Container Service (ACS/AKS)

April 12, 2018 Application Virtualization, Azure, Azure Container Service, Cloud Computing, Cloud Services, Computing, Containers, Docker, Emerging Technologies, IaaS, Kubernates, Microsoft, OpenSource, Orchestrator, OS Virtualization, PaaS, Virtual Machines, Virtualization, Windows Azure Development No comments

I will start with history: Sometime around 2016, Microsoft launched an IaaS service called Azure Container Service a.k.an ACS serves as a bridge between Azure Ecosystem and existing container ecosystem being used widely by the developer community around the world.

kubernates_azureIt helps as a gateway for infrastructure engineers and developers to manage underlying infrastructure such as Virtual Machines, Storage, Network Load Balancing services individually than the application itself.  The application developer doesn’t have to worry about planet-scale of the application, instead, a container orchestrator can manage the scale up and scale down of your application environment based on peaks and downs of your application usage.

It offers an option to select from 3 major container orchestrators available today such as DC/OS, Swarm, Docker, and Kubernates.   ACS along with your choice of container orchestrators works efficiently with different container ecosystems to enable the promise of application virtualization.

To make it simpler, ACS is your Super Glue to gel your Azure infrastructure and your container orchestrator together. Means you will be able to make your fully managed container cluster in a matter of minutes with Azure.

ACS is for making your microservices dream come true, by providing individual services scale according to the demand and automatically reduce the scale, if usage is low. You don’t have to worry, ACS and your container orchestrator will take care of you.

If you are a beginner to container-based infrastructure for your applications, you don’t have to take the pain at all of setting up Kubernates on your own, instead, ACS will simplify your implementation with a couple of easier click thru’s and your container infrastructure is ready to be fully managed by you. As simple as that.

What is Azure Container Kubernates Service (AKS) then?

As I am writing today, Microsoft has a new fully managed PaaS service called as Azure Container Service (AKS) or Managed Kubernates, meaning that Kubernates would be your default fully managed container orchestrator, if you choose Azure Container Service. But you would be able to deploy other open-source container orchestrators if you prefer to choose to have your own unmanaged Kubernates, Docker or DC/OS and then add your specific management and monitoring tools.

This service is currently available in PUBLIC PREVIEW, you can get started from here

Means though it is a fully managed service, you still have the option to manage it your own using your preferred set of tools and orchestrators.

Charging Model

Whether you manage your AKS service with your own set of tools and orchestrator or you use Fully Managed Kubernates, you only need to pay for resources you consume. No need to worry about per-cluster charges like other providers.

Useful References:

WordPress Blog in Azure App Service In Minutes–Part 02 (Configuring WordPress)

March 24, 2018 App Service, Azure, Back-2-Bascis, Emerging Technologies, KnowledgeBase, Microsoft, OpenSource, Tips & Tricks, Web Development, Windows Azure Development No comments

In the last part of this series, we experienced how to create a new wordpress blog instance in Azure App Service. In this part we will learn, how to configure your wordpress instance for publishing.

Now that we have WordPress instance deployed in Azure App Service, lets expore the app service instance a bit.

Step 1: Go to “All Resources” and select “mywordpress-blog” app

image

Step 2:  Copy URL and open in another browser window

image

Step 3: WordPress Configuration will automatically kick-in.  Select your desired language, in my case it would be ‘English’ and click on Continue.

image

Step 4: Specify your blog name, initial admin username, password, email etc.

Click on [Install WordPress]

image

Step 5: Congragulations!, Your installation is successful and you will be greeted with Success message. Now it is your time to get started with your blog.

image

You can simply login to <your_wordpress_website_url>/wp-admin, with the admin login and start creating your content.

If you are a beginner and need additional help in using wordpress, please visit – Official WordPress-Configuration  Help

WordPress Blog in Azure App Service In Minutes–Part 01

March 24, 2018 App Service, Azure, Azure Database for MySQL, Back-2-Bascis, CodeSnippets, JumpStarts, KnowledgeBase, Microsoft, OpenSource, Tips & Tricks, Windows, Windows Azure Development No comments

All my life I have been a tech saavy person would make my hands dirty trying out all odds available.

Here I am going to help you with setting up your own WordPress Blog in Azure App Service.

SPOILER ALERT: We will be using a B1 – Basic instance to save the cost.

image

Step 1: Login to Azure Portal

Step 2: Click on New

Step 3: Search for “Wordpress” among resources  and Select WordPress

image

Step 4: Click on ‘CREATE’

image

Step 5: Enter App Service Instance Name

image

Step 6: Now Select Database Provider. We need MySQL as the database and we have two options provided by Azure

1. Azure Database for MySQL ( a managed MySQL instance)  which has become publically available few days back.

2. MySQL In App (an instance hosted within App Service instance, basically your web app and mysql will be sharing the computing capabilities of the instance).

For the interest of the article, I will go with Option 2: MySQL InApp

image

Step 7: Specify App Service Plan /Location

As metioned in the spoiler we will go with a B1 Basic tier in West Europe location.

image

Step 8: Turn Application Insights ON and Specify location (This is optional, you do not want Application Insights performance logging for your blog, you can simply ignore)

Step 9: You are ready to go, click on [CREATE] to start the deployment.

image

Step 10: Now you see the deployment in progress message in Azure Portal.

image

image

Wait until this deployment is finished to setup WordPress initial configuration for use along with your custom domain.  We will continue with our setup in next part of this series.