Azure CLI

Azure Cosmos DB–Multi Master

October 8, 2018 .NET, .NET Core, .NET Framework, ASP.NET, Azure, Azure CLI, Azure Cosmos DB, CosmosDB, Data Consistancy, Data Integrity, Microsoft, Multi-master, Performance, Reliability, Resilliancy, Scalability, Scale Up No comments

During the Ignite 2018, Microsoft has announced the general availability of Multi-Master feature being introduced to Azure Cosmos DB to provide more control into data redundancy and elastic scalability for your data from different regions with multiple writes and read instances.

What is Multi-Master essentially?

Multi-master is a capability that provided as part of Cosmos DB, that would provide you multiple write regions and provides an option to handle conflict resolution automatically through different options provided by the platform. Most of the major scenarios you would encounter the conflict can be resolved with these simple configurations.

A sample diagram depicting a use case of load balanced web app writing to respective regional master:-

image

With multi-master, Azure Cosmos DB delivers a single digit millisecond write latency at the 99th percentile anywhere in the world, and now offers 99.999 percent write availability (in addition to 99.999 percent read availability) backed by the industry-leading SLAs.

image

Wow! That’s an amazing performance Cosmos DB guarantees to provide so that your mission-critical systems will have zero downtime, if they start using Cosmos DB.

 

How to Enabled Multi-Master support in your Cosmos DB solutions?

Currently multi-master can only be enabled for new Cosmos DB instances using “Enable Multi-Master” option in Azure Portal or through PowerShell or ARM templates or through SDK.

These options are detailed below with necessary examples:

1.) Azure Portal – Enable Multi-region writes and Enable geo-redundancy

image

2.) Azure CLI 
Set the “enable-multiple-write-locations” parameter to “true”

az cosmosdb create \
   –-name "thingx-cosmosdb-dev" \
   --resource-group "consmosify-dev" \
   --default-consistency-level "Session" \
   --enable-automatic-failover "true" \
   --locations "EastUS=0" "WestUS=1" \
   --enable-multiple-write-locations true \

3.) AzureRM PowerShell
In AzureRM PowerShell cmdlet – Set enableMultipleWriteLocations parameter to “true”

$locations = @(@{"locationName"="East US"; "failoverPriority"=0},
             @{"locationName"="West US"; "failoverPriority"=1})

$iprangefilter = ""

$consistencyPolicy = @{"defaultConsistencyLevel"="Session";
                       "maxIntervalInSeconds"= "10";
                       "maxStalenessPrefix"="200"}

$CosmosDBProperties = @{"databaseAccountOfferType"="Standard";
                        "locations"=$locations;
                        "consistencyPolicy"=$consistencyPolicy;
                        "ipRangeFilter"=$iprangefilter;
                        "enableMultipleWriteLocations"="true"}

New-AzureRmResource -ResourceType "Microsoft.DocumentDb/databaseAccounts" `
  -ApiVersion "2015-04-08" `
  -ResourceGroupName "consmosify-dev" `
  -Location "East US" `
  -Name "thingx-cosmosdb-dev" `
  -Properties $CosmosDBProperties

4.) Through CosmosDB SDK
Setting connection policy in DocumentDBClient and set UseMultipleWriteLocations to true.

ConnectionPolicy policy = new ConnectionPolicy
{
   ConnectionMode = ConnectionMode.Direct,
   ConnectionProtocol = Protocol.Tcp,
   UseMultipleWriteLocations = true,
};
policy.PreferredLocations.Add("East US");
policy.PreferredLocations.Add("West US");
policy.PreferredLocations.Add("West Europe");
policy.PreferredLocations.Add("North Europe");
policy.PreferredLocations.Add("Southeast Asia");
policy.PreferredLocations.Add("Japan East");
policy.PreferredLocations.Add("Japan West");

Azure Cosmos DB multi-master configuration is the game changes that really makes it a true global scale database with automatic conflict resolution capabilities for data synchronization and consistancy.

In my later sessions I will write examples to cover how conflict resolutions can be configured and used in realtime scenarios.

Useful Refs:

Getting Started with Azure CLI 2.0

September 30, 2018 Azure, Azure CLI, Azure Cloud Shell, AzureRM.PowerShell, PowerShell No comments

Older days we used to manage azure resources through AzureRM PowerShell modules . This was very much flexible for any Azure Administrator or Developers to run Automated Deployments to Azure Resource Manager resources.

Azure CLI  is the next improved version with simplified cmdlets to make life easier and it is cross-platform.

You can use Azure CLI in two ways:

  1. Azure Portal – Through Azure Cloud Shell
  2. PowerShell module

Installation Steps:

  • Download Azure CLI designed for Linux/Windows/MacOS based on your OS.
  • Install image and follow the steps.

 

image

image

  • Verify the Installation by executing cmdlet [  az –version  ]
az –-version

image

Running the Azure CLI from PowerShell has some advantages over running the Azure CLI from the Windows command prompt, provides additional tab completion features.

Now let us try logging in to Azure using Azure CLI. There are various ways of logging in, for this article I would try simple web login using az login command.

Execute the following cmdlet to login to Azure:

az login

The Azure CLI will  launch your default browser to open the Azure sign-in page. After a successful sign in, you’ll be connected to your Azure subscription.  If it fails, follow the command-line instructions and enter an authorization code at https://aka.ms/devicelogin.

Create a azure resource group and verify:

az group create –name "thingx-dev" –location "southcentralus" 
az group list --output table

 

Hope that is helpful for you to get started with Azure CLI. To learn more about Azure CLI cmdlets : https://github.com/Azure/azure-cli