ASP.NET MVP

Introduction to The One ASP.NET Platform/Ecosystem

December 25, 2012 .NET, .NET Framework, .NET Framework 4.5, ADO.NET, All, ASP.NET, ASP.NET 4.5, ASP.NET AJAX, ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET MVP, C#.NET, Community, HTML, HTML5, IIS, JavaScript, JavaScript, jQuery, JQuery Mobile, KnowledgeBase, LINQ, Microsoft, MSDN, SignalR, Updates, VB.NET, VisualStudio, VS2012, WCF, Web, Web API No comments

Introduction

ASP.NET has travelled a long way through evolutions. Earlier when ASP.NET 1.0 was released as part of .NET Framework 1.0 in Jan 2002, there was only ASP.NET – a framework for building dynamic web applications and it provided lots of flexibility web developers in building robust, dynamic web applications.  ASP.NET was and is the successor to Microsoft’s Active Server Pages (ASP) technology.

ASP.NET is built on the Common Language Runtime (CLR), allowing programmers to write ASP.NET code using any supported .NET language. The ASP.NET SOAP extension framework allows ASP.NET components to process SOAP messages.

From that, today we reached ASP.NET 4.5 and platform/web framework has changed a lot through the 10 years of journey.

Before going further lets go through a quick summery of additions in each releases:

ASP.NET 1.0 (January 16, 2002)

  • Object-oriented Web application development supporting inheritance, polymorphism and other standard OOP features
  • Support for generic HTML controls and ASP.NET dynamic web controls
  • Event based programming
  • The developer can make use of DLL class libraries and other features of the Web server to build more robust applications that do more than simply rendering HTML.
  • Integrated development support using Visual Studio .Net 2002

ASP.NET 1.1 (April 24, 2003)

  • With ASP.NET 1.1 – an update to .NET framework 1.0 called as .Net framework 1.1 – we received support for Mobile Web Controls, Automatic input validation
  • Integrated development support using Visual Studio .Net 2003

ASP.NET 2.0 (November 7, 2005)

ASP.NET 2.0 introduced major updates to ASP.NET framework with introduction of Master pages and new data controls.

The interesting features included in this release were:

  • Integrated development support using Visual Studio 2005
  • New data controls (GridView, FormView, DetailsView)
  • New technique for declarative data access (SqlDataSource, ObjectDataSource, XmlDataSource controls)
  • Navigation controls
  • Master pages
  • Login controls
  • Themes
  • Skins
  • Web parts
  • Personalization services
  • Full pre-compilation
  • New localization technique
  • Support for 64-bit processors
  • Provider class model
  • Web Sites projects are introduced. An alternative to Web Application project model in earlier versions.
  • ASP.NET AJAX has been introduced as a separate installer. Included ScriptManager, UpdatePanel etc.

ASP.NET 3.5 (November 19, 2007)

This was an incremental update to ASP.NET 2.0 and .NET Framework 2.0. Base level the Runtime was depending on .NET Framework 2.0 and set of additional runtime extension components been introduced in this release.

The interesting features included in this release were:

  • Integrated development support using Visual Studio 2008
  • New data controls (ListView, DataPager, LinqDataSource)
  • ASP.NET AJAX included as part of the framework
  • Support for HTTP pipelining and syndication feeds.
  • WCF support for RSS, JSON, POX and Partial Trust
  • All the .NET Framework 3.5 changes, like LINQ etc.

With .NET Framework 3.5 Service Pack 1, some more features been introduced

  • Integrated development support using Visual Studio 2008 – Service Pack 1
  • Incorporation of ASP.NET Dynamic Data
  • Entity Framework support
  • Support for controlling browser history in an ASP.NET AJAX application
  • Ability to combine multiple JavaScript files into one file for more efficient downloading
  • New namespaces System.Web.Abstractions and System.Web.Routing
  • JQuery is included as part of the template.
  • ASP.NET MVC is born

Now ASP.NET framework is spitted in to three based on the purpose

ASP.NET Core Services – all the major ASP.NET runtime components has been built in to this and will act as a base layer for all other ASP.NET components such as Web Forms, MVC, Dynamic Data etc.

Now we have three Presentation Frameworks/Components that utilizes the ASP.NET Core runtime components

  1. ASP.NET Web Forms – based on traditional ASP.NET web application model – dynamic *.aspx pages with code behind file.
  2. ASP.NET MVC – based on MVC model – *.aspx pages for View, no code behind file. Simply depended on Controller and model.
  3. ASP.NET Dynamic data – the quick and easy – rapid application development model with help of LINQ and Entity Framework. ASP.NET Dynamic Data helps you quickly build a fully customizable, data-driven application without writing code. Dynamic Data provides a rich scaffolding framework that is easily extensible by using the traditional ASP.NET programming model.

ASP.NET 4.0 (April 12, 2010)

The .NET Framework version 4 includes enhancements for ASP.NET 4 in targeted areas. Visual Studio 2010 and Microsoft Visual Web Developer Express also include enhancements and new features for improved Web development.

The interesting features included in this release were:

  • Integrated development support using Visual Studio 2010
  • jQuery Included with Web Forms and MVC
  • Content Delivery Network Support
  • Setting Meta Tags with the Page.MetaKeywords and Page.MetaDescription Properties
  • ASP.NET MVC 3.0 with Web Pages and razor support
  • IISExpress Support through Service Pack1
  • and more… You can read about it in detail on the MSDN page What’s New in ASP.NET 4 and Visual Web Developer

 

ASP.NET 4.5 (August 15, 2012)

This was a long awaited release since ASP.NET 4.0, which includes the new improved support for Web Pages, MVC and new Web API support. With the release of .NET Framework 4.5 and Visual Studio 2012, decided to go away from Service Packs and release incremental updates whenever available.

The interesting features included in this release were:

  • Async support – HttpRequest, Response, HTTP Modules and Handlers are capable of handling Async request and responses.
  • AntiXSS library is integrated
  • WebSockets protocol support
  • Lazy request validation
  • ASP.NET Web Forms – Model binding similar to ASP.NET MVC
  • HTML5 support
  • ASP.NET MVC 4, Web Pages 2.0, Web API, ASP.NET MVC 4 – Mobile Web Templates using jQuery Mobile
  • and more… You can read about it in detail on the MSDN page What’s New in ASP.NET 4.5 and Visual Web Developer

ASP.NET and Web Tools 2012.2 update

This .2 update adds a number of new templates and features including:

  • Enhancements to Web Publishing
  • New Web API functionality
  • New templates for Facebook Application and Single Page Application
  • Real-time communication via ASP.NET SignalR
  • Extensionless Web Forms via ASP.NET Friendly URLs
  • Support for the new Windows Azure Authentication
  • and more… You can read about it in detail on the MSDN page What’s New in ASP.NET and Web Tools 2012.2 Update

SignalR

SignalR is a new member of the ASP.NET family that facilitates adding real-time functionality to web applications using WebSockets and other down-level transports. SignalR is a self-contained library installed via NuGet that is targeting a 1.0 RTW as part of the Fall Update. This will include item templates for adding SignalR connections and hubs to an ASP.NET application as well as a full project template that integrates with ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Web API.

[ Quoted from http://aspnet.codeplex.com  ]

THE ONE ASP.NET PLATFORM

Now the ASP.NET ecosystem would look as in the image, with 2012.2 release: Single platform – multiple, extensible solutions

All the parts of ASP.NET, all the subsystems are all part of the larger ASP.NET community 

[Image courtesy Scott Hanselman’s blog]

Scott Hanselman of Microsoft Quotes:

The idea behind One ASP.NET is that we want folks to be able to make apps that have real-time components with SignalR, clean, simple APIs with Web API, all in one pages with KnockoutJS, pages with MVC, Web Forms or Web Pages, as well as existing ASP.NET systems like OData, ASMX, and more.

We want open source projects like JSON.NET, KnockoutJS, SignalR, Backbone, MongoDB, Scaffolding, NHIbernate, Ninject (and the list goes on) to all play in the same ASP.NET LEGO sandbox.

We’ll put all these subcomponents on NuGet and they’ll live alongside community components and you’ll be able to build ASP.NET applications starting from some base template and add just the pieces you want. We are getting there. We want folks to use the parts they want, and swap out the parts they don’t. Everything should work together.

ScottGu Quotes
The new runtime functionality is delivered to ASP.NET via additional NuGet packages. This means that installing this update does not make any changes to the existing ASP.NET binaries, and thus does not cause any compatibility issues with existing projects. New projects will contain the new functionality and existing projects can be updated with the new NuGet packages.

You can further read about it through Scott Hanselman’s article and ScottGu’s blog 
 

Conclusion

Now with ASP.NET 4.5 and Updates we reached a place where we have a vast variety of technologies to choose from, to develop rich, dynamic web applications for Desktop browsers as well as for mobile browsers.

ASP.NET Ecosystem is growing and is moving in the right pace with the release to open source development of most of the components through http://aspnet.codeplex.com/ 

It is challenging and interesting for ASP.NET developers to be able to develop using such cutting edge technologies.

Information Sources & Courtesy: Wikipedia, MSDN and Microsoft Developer blogs

Beginning HTML5 Development with Visual Studio 2010

January 3, 2012 .NET, .NET Framework, All, ASP.NET, ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET MVP, CSS, CSS 3, HTML, HTML5, jQuery, JQuery Mobile, Microsoft, Mobile-Development, VisualStudio, VS2008, VS2010 3 comments

Recently I was doing some research works on HTML5 development using ASP.NET  on Visual Studio 2010.  Really liked the cool features HTML5, CSS3 and Javascript API’s. Major part of my research was around building mobile web applications using jQuery Mobile and Responsive Web.

Quick Intro of HTML5

  • HTML5 will be the new standard for HTML, XHTML, and the HTML DOM.
  • The previous version of HTML came in 1999. The web has changed a lot since then.
  • Today, some elements in HTML 4.01 are obsolete, never used, or not used the way they were intended to. These elements are deleted or re-written in HTML5.
  • HTML5 is still a work in progress. However, most modern browsers have some HTML5 support.
  • HTML5 is a cooperation between the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG).
  • WHATWG was working with web forms and applications, and W3C was working with XHTML 2.0. In 2006, they decided to cooperate and create a new version of HTML.

Some rules for HTML5 were established:

  1. New features should be based on HTML, CSS, DOM, and JavaScript
  2. Reduce the need for external plugins (like Flash)
  3. Better error handling
  4. More markup to replace scripting
  5. HTML5 should be device independent
  6. The development process should be visible to the public

and that’s  enough about HTML5.

If you are not aware of HTML5, you can read more about HTML5 later through the below links

http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML5

http://www.w3schools.com/html5/default.asp

Coming to jQuery Mobile…

  • jQuery Mobile, is a framework that will help you rapidly and confidently develop mobile app user interfaces across popular mobile device platforms like iOS and Android, is perhaps the most popular project out there.
  • The framework boasts a lightweight code base (weighing in at 20KB when minified and gzipped) and a huge bevy of standard user interface elements that mobile device users are accustomed to, such as switches and sliders.
  • JQuery Mobile, hails from a royal family of frameworks and spawned from community of jQuery, the most famous cross platform JS library.
  • Works great with mobile browsers from Symbian, Android through iOS to Blackberry, Window Phone 7, WebOS.
  • Visit http://jquerymobile.com for more details

JQueryMobile has been included as a standard binary include in upcoming ASP.NET MVC 4.0 by Microsoft.

Okey, that was little bit over talk about jQuery Mobile :-), lets look at the point I want to make.

Recent months there is an increasing trend of mobile web applications using HTML5, as most of the recent mobile browsers supports partially or up to certain level on HTML5 capabilities. The idea is that Multi Platform targeted mobile web application development.

 

To enable HTML5 syntax intelli- sense in Visual Studio 2010 we have the following options to try

1.) Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack 1 – Visual Studio 2010 was originally released without HTML5 support, so does SP1 finally add support for it, to some extent.

The entire HTML5 specification isn’t supported but most of the new elements and attributes are. That means you get both intellisense and validation for HTML5 with SP1.

2.) HTML 5 Intellisense for Visual Studio 2010 and 2008 Extension from  Mikhail Arkhipov (Microsoft)

Since Visual Studio 2010 doesn’t have complete support for all HTML5 and CSS3 syntax’s we can try this add-in to enable the support in Visual Studio 2010 and 2008.

3.) Web Standards Update for Visual Studio 2010 SP1

Web Platform and Tools team, spearheaded by Mads Kristensen  has released this update in Visual Studio Gallery. This adds better support for HTML5, CSS3 and new JavaScript features to ALL versions of Visual Studio.

Web Standards Update provides the much wanted HTML5 & CSS3 support to Visual Studio 2010 SP1. It brings VS 2010 intellisense & validation as close to W3C specification as we could get via means of an extension.  The most notable supported features by this extension are:

HTML5 – Video, Audio, Input Type, Drag & Drop, WAI-ARIA, Microdata, Schema.org
Browser API – GeoLocation & Local Storage
CSS3 – 2D Transforms, 3D Transforms, Animations, Background & Borders, Basic Box Model, Basic UI, Behavior, Color, Flexible Box Layout, Fonts, Paged Media, Hyperlink Presentation, Line, Lists, Marquee, Media Queries, Multi Column, Namespaces, Presentation Levels, Ruby, Selectors, Speech, Syntax, Template Layout, Text & Transitions. It also supports vendor specific prefixes like -ms, -webkit & -moz.

Refer to  Scott Hanselman’s blog for more detailed update : http://www.hanselman.com/blog/AnnouncingTheWebStandardsUpdateHTML5SupportForTheVisualStudio2010Editor.aspx

Get Web Standards Update for Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 SP1

4.) A Little Old Way 

To enable Intellisense to work with HTML 5, perform the following steps:

  1. Download the HTML5 support package for Visual Studio 2008 from the Visual Web Developer team here.
  2. Copy the html_5.xsd in C:Program Files (x86)Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0Common7Packagesschemashtml
  3. Edit the correct registry file and replace 9.0 with 10.0
    The file will look like this ( 64 bit VS 2010 Ultimate for me ):

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoftVisualStudio10.0Packages{1B437D20-F8FE-11D2-A6AE-00104BCC7269}SchemasSchema 23]
“File”=”htmlhtml_5.xsd”
“Friendly Name”=”HTML 5”
“URI”=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/intellisense/html-5”

  1. Run the registry file to merge it with your registry.
  2. Open Visual Studio 2010
  3. Go to Tools->Options->Text Editor->HTML->Validation
  4. Select target as HTML 5

This would allow you to get Intellisense for your HTML 5 based projects.

referenced from http://amargalla.com/Blog/general/169-html-5-with-visual-studio-2010

Not only that Visual Studio Gallery is having lots of cool Extensions such as Mobile Ready Templates using HTML5, and other extension templates you could try.  Some of them are….

Mobile Ready HTML5 MVC.NET

Creates a mobile ready MVC 3.0 project using the Razor’s view engine and jQuery mobile. Both mobile and desktop versions can be tested using mobile emulators or browsers.

CSS 3 Intellisense Schema

jQuery Mobile Site

Yet another Mobile Ready ASP.NET MVC Template. Use this MVC 3 Razor Site Template with jQuery Mobile boilerplate layout, scripts and CSS referenced to create adaptable websites for a variety of devices.

So we do have wide variety of ways we can enable HTML5 support when using Visual Studio 2010. Of course we already having HTML5 support included with ASP.NET MVC 3.0 Tools Update,  but the above options will help us in enabling Intellisense support for normal ASP.NET applications as well. 

Hope this will help you with your HTML5 development..

Happy Coding !!!